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FGCU avoids huge upset, beats Florida Tech 62-54

It wasn’t pretty, but when the game was on the line the FGCU men’s basketball team rose to the occasion. In the final tune-up before conference play begins, the Eagles escaped a huge upset bid by defeating Florida Tech 62-54.

The visiting Panthers, a Division II opponent, held a 46-44 lead with 6:55 left in the game. That’s when FGCU responded with an 11-0 run to reclaim a comfortable lead they wouldn’t relinquish.

Junior guard Zach Johnson eclipsed the 1,000-point mark (1,004) for his career. Johnson became the ninth Eagle to do so and third junior to accomplish the feat in program history.

The win also gave head coach Joe Dooley his 100th victory as FGCU head coach. The Eagles begin conference play at home on January 6th, hosting Stetson at 7 p.m.

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Stranger caught lurking outside of homes just doing his job

A man that was caught on video walking up to a Cape Coral home and taking a picture of the front door before walking away caused concerns for neighbors.

However, it turns out, the man was just doing his job.

He’s a subcontractor for a legitimate company and was taking the picture to perform a routine occupancy check for the homeowner’s mortgage company.

“We’re required to take a picture to verify that we’re at the right address they’re sending us to,” said Jason Yanesh.

Yanesh’s company is contracted by mortgage companies and FEMA to do occupancy checks.

“All these mortgage companies are hiring to to kind of check on their asset,” explained Yanesh.

Yanesh said he provides his sub-contractors with badges and t-shirts to show who they are, but he can’t guarantee they’ll always wear the appropriate attire.

Yanesh explained that occupancy checks are a common practice, and his company performed 8,000 last month.  He also explained that his sub-contractors receive a background check.

“We’re not snooping around, we’re just trying to do our job and show the mortgage company that their home is occupied and its in good standing condition,” Yanesh said.

© Copyright 2017 WBBH/WZVN (Waterman Broadcasting). All rights reserved.

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Seffner boy, 6, dies in motel after stepfather throws him against wall

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, Fla. (WFLA) – Detectives say a 6-year-old boy is dead after his stepfather threw him against a wall at a Seffner motel.

Jack Junior Montgomery, 31, faces a felony first-degree murder charge in connection with the death of 6-year-old Brice Russell.

At 10:50 a.m. Saturday, Montgomery called 911 to report he found his stepson unresponsive inside their room at the Masters Inn in Seffner.

Upon arrival, the Hillsborough County Fire Rescue found the child laying in a bed. He was pronounced dead at 10:59 a.m.

Investigators say the child and his three siblings were in Montgomery’s care while their mom, Donya Shenita Russell, 28, was at work.

His siblings told investigators they woke up to find the 6-year-old in tears. They said they had witnessed Montgomery hit Brice and throw him around the room. They said their stepfather threatened them with violence if they would not join in and punch their brother, and one ended up striking the child out of fear.

Investigators said the children watched Montgomery pick Brice up by the leg and throw him into a shelf along a wall. They saw blood running out of the child’s nose and mouth, and said their brother never woke up after that.

Detectives ultimately determined that Montgomery had punched the child in the face, mouth and stomach with a closed fist, threw the victim around the hotel room and shoved his face into the carpet.

Montgomery was arrested Sunday and charged with first-degree murder.

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ABC-7 | WZVN

Seffner boy, 6, dies in motel after stepfather throws him against wall

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, Fla. (WFLA) – Detectives say a 6-year-old boy is dead after his stepfather threw him against a wall at a Seffner motel.

Jack Junior Montgomery, 31, faces a felony first-degree murder charge in connection with the death of 6-year-old Brice Russell.

At 10:50 a.m. Saturday, Montgomery called 911 to report he found his stepson unresponsive inside their room at the Masters Inn in Seffner.

Upon arrival, the Hillsborough County Fire Rescue found the child laying in a bed. He was pronounced dead at 10:59 a.m.

Investigators say the child and his three siblings were in Montgomery’s care while their mom, Donya Shenita Russell, 28, was at work.

His siblings told investigators they woke up to find the 6-year-old in tears. They said they had witnessed Montgomery hit Brice and throw him around the room. They said their stepfather threatened them with violence if they would not join in and punch their brother, and one ended up striking the child out of fear.

Investigators said the children watched Montgomery pick Brice up by the leg and throw him into a shelf along a wall. They saw blood running out of the child’s nose and mouth, and said their brother never woke up after that.

Detectives ultimately determined that Montgomery had punched the child in the face, mouth and stomach with a closed fist, threw the victim around the hotel room and shoved his face into the carpet.

Montgomery was arrested Sunday and charged with first-degree murder.

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NBC-2 | WBBH

Stranger caught lurking outside of homes just doing his job

A man that was caught on video walking up to a Cape Coral home and taking a picture of the front door before walking away caused concerns for neighbors.

However, it turns out, the man was just doing his job.

He’s a subcontractor for a legitimate company and was taking the picture to perform a routine occupancy check for the homeowner’s mortgage company.

“We’re required to take a picture to verify that we’re at the right address they’re sending us to,” said Jason Yanesh.

Yanesh’s company is contracted by mortgage companies and FEMA to do occupancy checks.

“All these mortgage companies are hiring to kind of check on their asset,” explained Yanesh.

Yanesh said he provides his sub-contractors with badges and t-shirts to show who they are, but he can’t guarantee they’ll always wear the appropriate attire.

Yanesh explained that occupancy checks are a common practice, and his company performed 8,000 last month.  He also explained that his sub-contractors receive a background check.

“We’re not snooping around, we’re just trying to do our job and show the mortgage company that their home is occupied and its in good standing condition,” Yanesh said.

© Copyright 2017 WBBH/WZVN (Waterman Broadcasting). All rights reserved.

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These are the top YouTube videos that went viral in 2017

CNN — YouTube’s top viral video in 2017 was a singing man in an oyster costume.

The masked performer was a contestant on Thailand’s aptly named singing competition show “The Mask Singer.” The man in the mask sings “Until We Will Become Dust,” which starts out as a ballad and eventually breaks into a rap.

The video has more than 182 million views on YouTube.

YouTube determined its top trending videos based on time spent watching, sharing, commenting, liking and other metrics. Here are the other top videos that went viral this year, in order.

    — Ed Sheeran’s “Shape of You” had people dancing all summer, although most people probably didn’t have moves like the ones in this choreography.

    — Seven minutes and 16 seconds of incredible table tennis trick shots. You probably don’t want to play beer pong against these guys.

    — This 12-year-old singing ventriloquist’s amazing performance on “America’s Got Talent.” It was so good it got her the Golden Buzzer treatment, sending her straight to the live shows.

    — Ed Sheeran made the list twice. This time, it was his debut on James Corden’s “Carpool Karaoke,” in which we learned Sheeran could stuff 55 Maltesers into his mouth at one time and that he doesn’t own a cellphone.

    — Lady Gaga’s Super Bowl LI halftime performance.

    — A hilarious, bad lip reading of Donald Trump’s inauguration.

    — A history of the entire world. Er — sort of. It’s basically years of science and social studies classes compressed into 20 minutes and translated for the internet era.

    — This animated short film about a closeted boy who fears being outed by his own heart will melt your heart.

    — And finally, who could forget the time this professor’s adorable kids crashed his BBC interview?

    The most watched music videos of 2017

    Here are the most watched music videos of the year. No surprise here: “Despacito” took the crown. Not only is Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee’s massive hit the most viewed music video this year, but it’s also the most viewed YouTube video of all time. Also worth noting is that six of the top 10 are sung in Spanish.

    1) Luis Fonsi – “Despacito,” featuring Daddy Yankee

    2) Ed Sheeran – “Shape of You

    3) J Balvin, Willy William – “Mi Gente”

    4) Maluma – “Felices los 4

    5) Bruno Mars – “That’s What I Like

    6) Chris Jeday – “Ahora Dice,” featuring J. Balvin, Ozuna, Arcángel

    7) El Amante – “Nicky Jam” (Álbum Fénix)

    8) Jason Derulo – “Swalla,” featuring Nicki Minaj and Ty Dolla $ign

    9) DJ Khaled – “I’m the One,” featuring Justin Bieber, Quavo, Chance the Rapper, Lil Wayne

    10) Enrique Iglesias – “SUBEME LA RADIO,” featuring Descemer Bueno, Zion and Lennox

    The-CNN-Wire™ & © 2017 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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    7 (totally doable) New Year’s resolutions that will change your life

    NBC Better — Does the New Year mean a new you — or another failed New Year’s resolution? Probably the latter for most of us, psychologists say, because thinking the flip of a calendar is enough to motivate us to ax all of our bad habits and behaviors is actually really unrealistic.

    “We typically make resolutions around our most challenging habits, such as losing weight, changing our diet, exercising more or stopping smoking,” said Timothy Pychyl, Ph.D, associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Carleton University.

    First of all, we’re not always as committed to those resolutions as we need to be to actually be motivated to stick with them, explains Pychyl, whose research focuses on procrastination and goal pursuit. (There’s a difference between changes we think we should make as opposed to changes we actually want to make.) And instead of setting discrete, measurable goals for ourselves, we often set broad intentions, like “exercise more,” he added. “We don’t think clearly enough about how we will implement this change.”

    Plus, there’s the fact that we only have so much willpower we can turn to to help us stick to the new habits, adds Roy Baumeister, professor of psychology at Florida State University and author of “Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength.”

    “When people try to make multiple changes, they put multiple demands on that limited willpower,” he said — and they end up failing.

    That means the more willpower it takes to skip the afternoon cookie break, the less you’ll have left to help you stick to your resolution to hit the gym that evening. (Baumeister’s research has shown that willpower — a type of mental energy — is actually fueled by glucose and can be strengthened and fatigued, just like our muscles.)

    What does work when it comes to resolutions is setting goals that are specific and attainable, so you know exactly what you need to do to accomplish it — and you do it.

    Small changes add up, said Elizabeth Beck, MPH, Professional Wellness Development & Education coordinator at the National Wellness Institute. “It’s very easy to fall into the trap of thinking that to make lasting and impactful changes, we must dive into something head first and dedicate a part of our lives to it,” she said. “Small habits are much easier to grow and become big changes in our life.”

    Here are a few such resolutions you can try in 2018 from Beck and other health and wellness experts that each take 10 extra minutes a day (or less), and can lead to BIG, impactful improvements for your health, happiness and well-being.

    1. SET A DAILY INTENTION

    It can be as simple as deciding not to overreact if your kids or another family member gets on your nerves — or take a walk over your lunch hour instead of not leaving your desk. If you feel like you’re living on auto-pilot, starting your day by setting a daily intention can help you feel more in control of your life and your actions, said Jody Michael, founder of and executive coach at the career and wellness coaching company, Jody Michael Associates. And over time, those intentions can each serve as a small step toward big changes, she said.

    2. CROSS OFF THE TOUGHEST TASK ON YOUR TO-DO LIST FIRST

    Figure out the toughest, most important or most intimidating task you want to get done by the end of the day and tackle it first, suggested Annie Lin, founder of career consulting firm New York Life Coaching. That way it’s done, so it’s not hanging over your head or stressing you out the rest of the day.

    “It will give you a tremendous sense of accomplishment,” Lin said. And you can let those positive, productive vibes motivate the rest of your day.

    3. START A BELLY BREATHING HABIT

    Shallow breathing keeps our bodies in that high-stress, fight-or-flight mode, Lin explains. But deep belly breathing sends a message to our brains to relax. Slowing down your breath can slow down the chatter in your head, and reduce stress and anxiety. (You may also find yourself thinking more clearly and sleeping better, Lin noted.)

    How to do it: You can literally do this anytime and anywhere. Just, stop. Focus your attention on your breath. Let all your air out and take a deep inhale, then exhale, then repeat. “Even if you can only practice it a few times a day, you can still enjoy the benefit,” Lin said.

    4. TAKE THE STAIRS INSTEAD OF THE ELEVATOR

    Stairs are a great way to quickly get the body moving, the heart rate up, and increase your metabolic rate — no gym required, said Michael Castiglione, a New York City-based personal trainer and fitness coach. It’s not the only change you’ll need to make if you have big weight-loss goals or want to get from the couch to a marathon finish line — but it can be the first step to just get in the habit of moving more, which can encourage you to be more active in other areas of your life, too.

    5. APOLOGIZE AUTHENTICALLY

    Whether you got in a tiff with a friend, family member or colleague, get better at apologizing by doing what you can to reconcile the conflict, rather than hold a grudge, said Emiliana Simon-Thomas, science director of the Greater Good Science Center at University of California, Berkeley. It takes little risk and little time, but it can be intrinsically rewarding in a big way.

    Being able to say you’re sorry and mean it, makes it easier to get back to a positive mood after going through something difficult, Simon-Thomas said. “Positive states, like contentment, warmth, and trust, are important to health, social connection, and focus — and they confer an overarching sense of personal stability and resilience to stress.”

    6. TELL A FAMILY MEMBER OR FRIEND ONE THING THAT WENT WELL EVERY WEEK

    Too often we get hung up on the little things that go wrong from day to day, rather than focusing on everything that’s going right and what we have accomplished, Beck said. Talking (out loud) about something that we’ve achieved helps us remember our true potential and the impact we’re having on the world around us.

    7. TAKE 10 MINUTES EVERY DAY TO DO SOMETHING FOR YOU

    It’s easy to get caught up in the whirlwind of work emails, after-school carpool schedules and life’s countless obligations. Spending 10 minutes of quality you-time could mean reading a magazine, meditating or playing with your pet, according to Beck. Focus on activities that not only make you feel good but also relieve stress and improve your well-being (diving into a bag of potato chips or mindlessly scrolling through your Facebook feed are NOT the goal).

    “When you take a moment to do something for you, you will start to feel a sense of calm in what otherwise may be a hectic day,” Beck said.

    And whichever resolution you choose, remember to be committed, celebrate the small successes as you do big ones and go easy on yourself, Pychyl said. “Be ready for setbacks and forgive yourself when you fail (which you WILL do),” he said. “Self-forgiveness re-establishes our motivation to try again.”

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    SLIDESHOW: Most wanted in Lee, Collier counties

    PREVIOUS LISTS
    Dec. 24, 2017
    Dec. 17, 2017
    Dec. 10, 2017
    Dec. 3, 2017
    Nov. 26, 2017
    Nov. 19, 2017
    Nov. 12, 2017
    Nov. 5, 2017
    Oct. 29, 2017
    Oct. 22, 2017
    Oct. 15, 2017
    Oct. 8, 2017
    Oct. 1, 2017
    Sept. 24, 2017
    Sept. 17, 2017
    Sept. 3, 2017
    Aug. 27, 2017
    Aug. 20, 2017
    Aug. 13, 2017
    Aug. 4, 2017
    July 30, 2017
    July 23, 2017
    July 16, 2017

    NBC2 will bring you a slideshow every Sunday of the most wanted suspects in Lee and Collier counties.

    Anyone with information on any of these suspects should call:

    — Lee County Sheriff’s Office, 239-477-1000;

    — Collier County Sheriff’s Office, 239-252-9300; or

    — Southwest Florida Crime Stoppers, 239-332-5555, toll-free 1-800-780-TIPS (1-800-780-8477). All callers will remain anonymous and will be eligible for a cash reward of up to $1,000. Tips may also be made online at southwestfloridacrimestoppers.com or by submitting a tip on the P3Tips mobile app.

    Note: Collier County releases their most wanted list once a month.


    © Copyright 2017 WBBH/WZVN (Waterman Broadcasting). All rights reserved.

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    For nearly 50 years, two Vietnam vets kept alive a New Year’s Eve pact


    James Hollingsworth, left, and William Cox in Marble Mountain, Vietnam. (Courtesy of Debora Walker)

    CNN — Hunkered in a Vietnam bunker, with rockets and mortar shells raining down, the two Marines made a pact.

    It was New Year’s Eve, 1968. And they promised that if they survived the war and made it home alive, the two would call each other every New Year’s Eve.

    And they did. For nearly half a century, Master Sgt. William Cox and Sgt. James Hollingsworth checked up on each other.

    But on Sunday, Cox will ring in the New Year alone.

    His friend “Hollie” died in October. He was 80 years old.


    Cox as a helicopter door gunner in the Vietnam War. (Courtesy of Debora Walker)

    A promise made

    Cox and Hollingsworth flew missions together as helicopter door gunners. On the ground in Vietnam, Hollingsworth helped maintain the choppers. Cox kept track of ammunition.

    In the midst of war, their friendship was a refuge.

    “Hollie and I, we had our antics to relieve the tension,” Cox said. They told each other things they didn’t tell anyone else.

    “Sometimes we would laugh, sometimes we would cry.

    “‘You know me better than my family,'” Cox recalls Hollingsworth telling him.


    Cox in uniform before Hollingworth’s funeral. (Courtesy of Debora Walker)

    A promise kept

    Hollingsworth or “Hollie” moved to Georgia after his tour in Vietnam.

    Cox stayed in the Marine Corps, serving 20 years.

    Early this year, Cox went to Georgia to visit his friend.

    It was clear there wouldn’t be a New Year’s phone call on the 50th year of their pact.

    Hollingsworth was terminally ill and asked his battle buddy to deliver the eulogy at his funeral.

    “After I left his house, I broke down,” Cox recalled. “Not about what he asked me to do, but that he was going to be checking out of life, and I was going to be a part of his departure. But I was obligated.”

    A final farewell

    In October, Cox fulfilled that final promise. He gave Hollingsworth’s eulogy and then stood vigil beside the coffin.


    Cox stands guard at Hollingsworth’s casket. (Courtesy of Debora Walker)

    “I wanted to be with him as long as I could,” he said. “If it had been me, he would have been standing there.”

    The Marine Corps motto is “Semper Fidelis,” Latin for “always faithful,” and those words resounded as Cox stood by Hollingsworth one last time.

    He ended the eulogy with a phrase the two used to repeat: “Hollie, you keep ’em flying, and I’ll keep ’em firing.”

    The-CNN-Wire™ & © 2017 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.

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    2-year-old drowns in Immokalee pool

    A 2-year-old girl drowned Saturday afternoon in Immokalee at her apartment complex’s community pool.

    The child was identified as Elizabeth Sebastian.

    Investigators have not said how she got into the pool, which has a fence around it and a sign that warns there’s no lifeguard on duty.

     A report released Tuesday states the girl’s mother, Andrea, was doing laundry when she told her two sons to find their sister because she wasn’t in sight. The two found Elizabeth floating face down in the deep end of the pool. One pulled her out and carried her to the house.

    Her mother told deputies that before Elizabeth was found, she hadn’t been seen for 15 minutes.

    “It’s very painful because the child was very friendly. It’s hard to explain that happened in one single moment,” said Rebeca Perez, who lives next door to the victim’s family. 

    Responders were called to the scene at 606 N. 9th St. around 3:45 p.m. They tried to revive her multiple times, but it was too late. The family was not home Sunday when we stopped by. 

    The sheriff’s office and the Department of Children and Families are investigating.

    The sheriff’s office report said the pool was fenced in, with child-lock gates. However, a portion of the fence on one side had been pulled away from the building near the water pumps, and the pool could be accessed from there.

    CCSO said it remains unknown how Elizabeth got into the pool.

    “It’s very painful because you can share the pain speaking as a mother. The loss of a child is very painful, especially after carrying it in the womb for nine months,” Perez said.

    This marks the fifth Southwest Florida child to drown in a pool in 2017. Drowning is the leading cause of death for kids ages 1-4 in Collier County. 

    © Copyright 2017 WBBH/WZVN (Waterman Broadcasting). All rights reserved.